Fingerprint text art!
I think this looks so cool. It takes some time, but it’s simple and straightforward enough. It’s a great craft to do with a kid, or reciprocally with a significant other.
The way to do this is:
Ink up your finger and make a non-smudgy fingerprint on a white sheet of paper.
Using a copy machine’s “enlarge” feature, blow it up as big as it can possibly be while still fitting on a standard 8.5”x11” sheet of paper. Now you have a big printed fingerprint.
Affix a sheet of tracing paper to your print, in a way that it won’t shift around. (I just held it down, but I admit my hands got tired pressing it neurotically into place. I suggest using painter’s tape to keep them both down to your table.)
Start writing any text that comes to mind, using the lines of your fingerprint as a guide. Mine was kind of a self-representation, less a biography than a long list of things I like or things that make me happy. But you could write a poem, or a favorite song, or a manifesto or whatever. Just write until you’ve written on all of the lines.
Remove the tracing paper from the print and put a blank sheet of paper behind the tracing paper so the text stands out a bit more.
Frame if desired — you’re done!
Here’s a detail of what it looks like up close:

Fingerprint text art!

I think this looks so cool. It takes some time, but it’s simple and straightforward enough. It’s a great craft to do with a kid, or reciprocally with a significant other.

The way to do this is:

  1. Ink up your finger and make a non-smudgy fingerprint on a white sheet of paper.
  2. Using a copy machine’s “enlarge” feature, blow it up as big as it can possibly be while still fitting on a standard 8.5”x11” sheet of paper. Now you have a big printed fingerprint.
  3. Affix a sheet of tracing paper to your print, in a way that it won’t shift around. (I just held it down, but I admit my hands got tired pressing it neurotically into place. I suggest using painter’s tape to keep them both down to your table.)
  4. Start writing any text that comes to mind, using the lines of your fingerprint as a guide. Mine was kind of a self-representation, less a biography than a long list of things I like or things that make me happy. But you could write a poem, or a favorite song, or a manifesto or whatever. Just write until you’ve written on all of the lines.
  5. Remove the tracing paper from the print and put a blank sheet of paper behind the tracing paper so the text stands out a bit more.
  6. Frame if desired — you’re done!

Here’s a detail of what it looks like up close:

    3 years ago | Tags: week thirty-eight project forty-six fingerprint text art papercraft

    Comments
    I can’t get over how adorable  and simple these little crepe paper roses are. They take so little time  and effort and even so little material! And yet they look totally  great.
I used this tutorial, which is a video of a woman making  them while preschoolers help her out, and they are pretty painfully  cute.
If I’d seen my mom yesterday, I would have loved to give her a tiny  bouquet of these with her Mother’s Day gift.

    I can’t get over how adorable and simple these little crepe paper roses are. They take so little time and effort and even so little material! And yet they look totally great.

    I used this tutorial, which is a video of a woman making them while preschoolers help her out, and they are pretty painfully cute.

    If I’d seen my mom yesterday, I would have loved to give her a tiny bouquet of these with her Mother’s Day gift.

    3 years ago | Tags: week nineteen project twenty-three crepe paper rose papercraft cheap craft handmade end result

    Comments
    Here’s what I made with the magazine covers I posted.
It’s a little basket — great little catch-all for jewelry or remote controls or what-have-you.
First, rip off your magazine covers, front and back. I used about 18 covers for this little guy (so: the covers from 9 magazines), but you can use more for a bigger basket, less for a smaller one, etc.
Then fold them in half lengthwise. Then again. Then again. You’re folding them in eighths to make narrow strips.



It helps to pull the strips across a hard corner (like a counter or a coffee table) to deepen the crease and keep them intact.



The result is a pile of these thick paper strips:



Now, you want to lay them out in a grid. The criss-crossed part of the grid is going to be the area of the bottom of your basket, so use as many strips as you need to make it the size and shape that you want. I went with a 4-by-5 grid (this is the 5-by-5 grid I originally eyeballed, then thought better of it and took one strip out). Make sure to keep them in really tight and at perfect right angles; here’s where your hot glue gun will come in handy (and doesn’t it always?). There’s no shame in a little glue to keep things where they should be.



Once you’ve got your bottom grid, you’re going to bend all of those loose ends up in the same direction. Start with the ones that are coming under the strip at the edges of the grids, because they’ll be on the inside of the next strip.
Next you’re threading another strip perpendicular to the grid, around what will become the sides of the basket. The bottom strips that were woven overhand at the edge are now going to be on the outside of these side strips; the bottom strips that were woven underhand will be on the inside. (That’s a confusing sentence; keep looking at the pictures.)



The way to make these strips long is to kind of tuck one of the ends of the strips into the ends of another. Since they’re all folded the same way, you can slide them into each other. (It’s kind of the same concept as making a super-long straw by tucking the ends into each other.)
Keep weaving, keep weaving, alternating as necessary, gluing all the way and making sure to keep your weave tight.
I only made the basket two strips deep (I wanted a little one); but if you want it taller, you can extend the upright strips by slipping in more strips in the straw-tucking method I explained, then keep weaving around. But when I came to what I wanted to be the topped, I trimmed the edge straight with scissors, then glued extra strips around and over the top to hide the cut edges. (Gives it a nice faux-foldover effect.)



Having this is so much better than having a stack of unread magazines cluttering my living room!
Protip: you can use any paper to make these baskets, but magazine covers are the sturdiest.

    Here’s what I made with the magazine covers I posted.

    It’s a little basket — great little catch-all for jewelry or remote controls or what-have-you.

    First, rip off your magazine covers, front and back. I used about 18 covers for this little guy (so: the covers from 9 magazines), but you can use more for a bigger basket, less for a smaller one, etc.

    Then fold them in half lengthwise. Then again. Then again. You’re folding them in eighths to make narrow strips.

    It helps to pull the strips across a hard corner (like a counter or a coffee table) to deepen the crease and keep them intact.

    The result is a pile of these thick paper strips:

    Now, you want to lay them out in a grid. The criss-crossed part of the grid is going to be the area of the bottom of your basket, so use as many strips as you need to make it the size and shape that you want. I went with a 4-by-5 grid (this is the 5-by-5 grid I originally eyeballed, then thought better of it and took one strip out). Make sure to keep them in really tight and at perfect right angles; here’s where your hot glue gun will come in handy (and doesn’t it always?). There’s no shame in a little glue to keep things where they should be.

    Once you’ve got your bottom grid, you’re going to bend all of those loose ends up in the same direction. Start with the ones that are coming under the strip at the edges of the grids, because they’ll be on the inside of the next strip.

    Next you’re threading another strip perpendicular to the grid, around what will become the sides of the basket. The bottom strips that were woven overhand at the edge are now going to be on the outside of these side strips; the bottom strips that were woven underhand will be on the inside. (That’s a confusing sentence; keep looking at the pictures.)

    The way to make these strips long is to kind of tuck one of the ends of the strips into the ends of another. Since they’re all folded the same way, you can slide them into each other. (It’s kind of the same concept as making a super-long straw by tucking the ends into each other.)

    Keep weaving, keep weaving, alternating as necessary, gluing all the way and making sure to keep your weave tight.

    I only made the basket two strips deep (I wanted a little one); but if you want it taller, you can extend the upright strips by slipping in more strips in the straw-tucking method I explained, then keep weaving around. But when I came to what I wanted to be the topped, I trimmed the edge straight with scissors, then glued extra strips around and over the top to hide the cut edges. (Gives it a nice faux-foldover effect.)

    Having this is so much better than having a stack of unread magazines cluttering my living room!

    Protip: you can use any paper to make these baskets, but magazine covers are the sturdiest.

    3 years ago | Tags: week eighteen project twenty-two upcycled repurpose magazine cover basket weaving papercraft craft handmade end result

    Comments
    I’ve been doing origami ever since the second grade. Apparently I was finishing my work before all the other kids, and then because I was so bored and frustrated I was acting out. So the school guidance counselor gave me a set of paper-folding instructions, so I had something ELSE to work on while I patiently waited.
Since then, I’ve folded St. George slaying a dragon, the nativity scene, a guy playing a piano (all one sheet of paper!), koi, orchids, venus flytraps, starships, and pretty much anything else you can think of. I’ve got the focus and the patience for it. I like sitting down and following instructions.
But one thing I hadn’t gotten a hang of was kusudama, the kind of origami where you fold dozens of modular pieces and fit them together into a ball. Somehow my patience couldn’t handle that—doing the same thing over and over on such a tiny scale.
However, they’re so pretty, I wanted to give it a shot. I started with something simple. A lot of these designs have you literally stringing them together with embroidery floss, but I wanted to start with something where I could just fold and insert. I held it together with glue; I could have gotten away without the glue, but given that a rambunctious cat has full rein of my apartment for at least six hours a day, I figured it wouldn’t last long if I didn’t fasten it.
Not wanted to waste my good origami paper on a first crude attempt, I actually used sheets of paper from a square notepad for this project (think Post-Its, without the gummy stuff that makes it an actual Post-It).
Only casualty: SuperGlue on my fingers for the next two days.

    I’ve been doing origami ever since the second grade. Apparently I was finishing my work before all the other kids, and then because I was so bored and frustrated I was acting out. So the school guidance counselor gave me a set of paper-folding instructions, so I had something ELSE to work on while I patiently waited.

    Since then, I’ve folded St. George slaying a dragon, the nativity scene, a guy playing a piano (all one sheet of paper!), koi, orchids, venus flytraps, starships, and pretty much anything else you can think of. I’ve got the focus and the patience for it. I like sitting down and following instructions.

    But one thing I hadn’t gotten a hang of was kusudama, the kind of origami where you fold dozens of modular pieces and fit them together into a ball. Somehow my patience couldn’t handle that—doing the same thing over and over on such a tiny scale.

    However, they’re so pretty, I wanted to give it a shot. I started with something simple. A lot of these designs have you literally stringing them together with embroidery floss, but I wanted to start with something where I could just fold and insert. I held it together with glue; I could have gotten away without the glue, but given that a rambunctious cat has full rein of my apartment for at least six hours a day, I figured it wouldn’t last long if I didn’t fasten it.

    Not wanted to waste my good origami paper on a first crude attempt, I actually used sheets of paper from a square notepad for this project (think Post-Its, without the gummy stuff that makes it an actual Post-It).

    Only casualty: SuperGlue on my fingers for the next two days.

    4 years ago | Tags: week two project two papercraft origami kusudama craft handmade end result

    Comments